BlackBerry expands licensing strategy for Enterprise of Things

BlackBerry expands licensing strategy for Enterprise of Things [Image: microgen via iStock]

BlackBerry has announced that it has further expanded the broad licensing strategy that addresses the growing need for secure, connected devices and endpoints in the Enterprise of Things (EoT). BlackBerry defines this as the network of intelligent connections and endpoints within the enterprise that enable products to move from sketch to scale.

The first phase of BlackBerry's strategy, which was announced in September 2016, was focused on providing secure and comprehensive Android software. BlackBerry said that it is now pursuing additional endpoints, which could include tablets, wearables, medical devices, appliances, point-of-sale terminals and other smartphones.

John Chen, executive chairman and chief executive at BlackBerry, said: “There is an incredible opportunity for connected devices to improve lives, but to realise its full potential, privacy and security must be embedded in every end point from the start.

“For example, companies providing medical monitoring devices must protect health data on the device, guarantee it connects securely to the healthcare system, and most importantly ensure that it cannot be hacked, BlackBerry Secure helps solve this triple threat.”

He went on to add that the company has taken a long-term approach to its licensing strategy, which includes “an expansive view” of the entire EoT ecosystem. He said that the company will work with a wide range of manufacturers in order to integrate its BlackBerry Secure software into “BlackBerry-branded and co-branded devices”.

In December, BlackBerry launched a comprehensive platform designed for the EoT. It was designed to drive the company's ongoing move to software. It is cloud-enabled and addresses the entire enterprise, from endpoint to endpoint.

BlackBerry said that data breaches and cybersecurity threats are some of the biggest roadblocks to realising the potential of the EoT, so BlackBerry wanted to allow businesses to confidentially and reliably transmit sensitive data between endpoints.