New chipset boosts physical endurance of IoT devices

New chipset boosts physical endurance of IoT devices (iStock/chombosan)

Like any other electronic devices, applications involved in the Internet of Things (IoT) have been targeted by cybercriminals looking to hack, disrupt and make zombies of a range of applications for a variety of reasons. 

However, while online crime and remote cyber security is a major issue, the fact that the IoT will be embedded in everyday devices means that a number of applications will be vulnerable to physical attacks. 

For that reason, the software firm has been developing devices designed to be physically robust so that they cannot simply be overcome by someone accessing data or overriding its operations by physically linking in to it with malevolent intent. 

Its security operations centre (SoC) has produced the Arm Cortex-M35P processor, the first Cortex-M chipset ever to bring together anti-tampering technology and strong software isolation. 

This means that the kind of security present in smartcards can now be applied in IoT devices like smart meters, door locks and automotive products.  

A key feature of the increased robustness of the devices is the upgraded security IP, which is designed to protect silicon against physical assaults, including the use of electromagnetic analysis to defend devices against close proximity side-channel attacks.

Vice president and general manager of Arm Paul Williamson noted that the company has been focusing on this form of security after publishing the Arm Security Manifesto last year.  

He said its mission recognising that "security is no longer optional" if the IoT is to expand to a trillion devices by 2035. 

Mr Williamson commented: "IoT security is a multi-faceted problem with billions of diverse devices requiring a system-wide approach for protecting them. 

"The diversity in this space is challenging for our partners, and today we’re announcing new products that provide a critical layer of system protection by empowering SoC designers to incorporate higher levels of security, in the growing set of applications that require protection against physical attack threats."