First year of GDPR ‘boosts confidence’ in data security

First year of GDPR 'boosts confidence' in data security

Almost a year after the EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into force, a new survey has found employees are increasingly confident their business is taking effective steps to protect sensitive personal data.

Research by ADP found the legislation has had a positive impact on workers' perceptions of their organisations' security, with more than half of respondents (53 per cent) saying their employer is storing their data securely and responsibly. This marked an increase of six percentage points from 2018, prior to the rules being enacted.

This weekend (May 25th) will mark exactly a year since the wide-ranging rules came into force, and despite widespread concern in the leadup to the go-live date that firms would not be prepared for the impact of such changes, it appears that employees are happy with the efforts being made.

Chief privacy officer at ADP Cecile Georges said: "It's highly encouraging to see that the implementation of GDPR has coincided with a significant rise in employee confidence, suggesting that employees feel more assured than they were prior to GDPR that companies will actually comply with data protection requirements."

She added it is crucial for both employees and employers that organisations have a thorough understanding of their responsibilities under GDPR and what the impact will be if they are careless in their handling of the workforce's private personal data.

"GDPR has already led to positive results but companies must continue to work to maintain data security and ensure their employees feel confident about the way their employers hold and process their personal data," Ms Georges continued.

Despite the positive results overall, ADP's survey still found that around a quarter of UK workers (26 per cent) have concerns about the safety of personal data held by their employer.

The biggest worry is that they have no control over the data being stored (11 per cent), while nine per cent expressed concern that their organisation’s systems are vulnerable to cyber-attacks or data breaches and a further eight per cent felt too much data is being held without their consent.