Multi-cloud complexity ‘stopping businesses capitalising’

Multi-cloud complexity is ‘stopping businesses capitalising’ [Image: Just_Super via iStock]

Enterprises are not making the most of multi-cloud product portfolios due to their complex natures, new research has found.

451 Research’s ‘Voice of the enterprise: cloud transformation’ study found that the growth in multi- and hybrid cloud will make optimising and analysing cloud expenditure increasingly difficult.

Dr Owen Rogers, research director at 451 Research, said: “Cloud buyers have access to more capabilities than ever before, but the result is greater complexity. It is a nightmare for enterprises to calculate the cost of computing using a single cloud provider, let alone comparing providers or planning a multi-cloud strategy.

“The cloud was supposed to be a simple utility like electricity, but new innovations and new pricing models, such as AWS Reserved Instances, mean the IT landscape is more complex than ever.”

The report also revealed how quickly enterprises are moving to hybrid and multi-cloud environments, bringing the predicted growth of the cloud market to $53.3 billion (£45 billion) in 2021 from $28.1 billion this year.

According to the report, the incorporation of cloud systems is now mainstream among businesses, with 90 per cent of organisations surveyed using some type of cloud service. In addition, analysts expect 60 per cent of workloads to be running in some form of hosted cloud service by 2019, up from 45 per cent today. The researchers said this represents a “pivot from DIY-owned and operated to cloud or hosted third-party IT services”.

The company found that the future of IT is multi-cloud and hybrid, with 69 per cent of respondents expecting to have some form of multi-cloud environment by 2019.

Meanwhile, the latest data from 451 Research’s Market Monitor found that the cloud computing as a service market is expected to grow by 27 per cent to $28.1 billion in 2017, compared to 2016. With a five-year compound annual growth rate of 19 per cent, cloud computing as a service is now expected to reach $53.3 billion in 2021.