Most European organisations ‘lack a proper multi-cloud strategy’

Most European organisations 'lack a proper multi-cloud strategy' (iStock)

The overwhelming majority of organisations in Europe do not yet have a fully-fledged multi-cloud strategy, according to a study by the International Data Corporation.

A successful multi-cloud strategy depends on making decisions based on the needs of each workload, some of which are best suited to the public cloud and others to the private cloud. Moreover, buyers of IT services and equipment need to continually reassess the situation as the cloud landscape itself is subject to ongoing change. 

Reflecting on the need for firms to have a strategy in place that is sufficiently agile and comprehensive enough to cope, IDC research director Giorgio Nebuloni remarked: "Virtually all European enterprises will soon use multiple cloud services. The smart ones are already actively planning for those services to be benchmarked, price-compared and selected against each other based on the workload need.

"To get there, a central point of control based on software and potentially services is needed, as are strategic approaches to skill sets, processes, and data centre infrastructure."

Overall, the survey found just nine per cent are "pathfinders", which means they are already multi-cloud ready. By contrast, 80 per cent are still in the process of developing a strategy and are thus still in transition from a hybrid cloud environment. The rest were described as "bystanders", where little or no effort was being made to adjust to the changing cloud environment.

As a result, 34 per cent of organisations have no current plans to move their workloads away from their present cloud arrangements in the next year. However, some markets are more fluid in their approach, wth 29 per cent of British organisations looking to switch cloud provider.

The management and control of costs is, perhaps predictably, the leading priority when it comes to multi-cloud management, with 42 per cent of organisations citing this concern. The figure rises to 51 per cent in the largest enterprises.