Half of firms putting data at risk in the cloud

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More than half of organisations could be putting their security at risk by not having effective visibility into how data management policies are being applied and enforced when they migrate these assets to the cloud, a new study has wanted.

Research conducted by Druva revealed that overall, adoption of cloud tools continue to grow, with more than four out of ten firms (41 per cent) now running virtual machines (VMs) in the cloud. This is up from 31 per cent last year, while 90 per cent of businesses say they have plans to run cloud-based VMs if they are not doing so already.

However, it also revealed that 55 per cent of organisations have no plans to consolidate and centralise they data across the hybrid or multi-cloud environment, which Druva warned will lead to more data silos emerging. What's more, 54 per cent of respondents said they have no visibility into the effectiveness of their data management policies.

The organisation stated this is leading to a "critical gap" in data visibility that could result in a higher risk of data infractions and compliance failures, such as not purging data in time, per retention and compliance regulations.

Dave Packer, vice-president of products and alliances at Druva, said that while the study showed continued momentum for the cloud as a platform for virtualised workloads, it is clear that this demand will bring new security challenges that businesses must address.

"The cloud forces organisations … to be more disciplined in how they approach consumption of cloud resources," he continued. "While the benefits of moving to the cloud are huge, the visibility and data management requirements are higher to ensure organisations realise cost savings, which is why more than 53 per cent of respondents are still struggling to hit that target."

Elsewhere, the survey also suggested it is a misconception that the potential for cost savings are a key driver of cloud adoption, as just one in five firms stated this was the most important reason for making the migration. Instead, 'ease of management' and the the cloud being 'part of a critical IT initiative', were cited as the most significant drivers this year.